Ma. Ceres Doyo

No greater Love

By Ma. Ceres Doyo

“True to form, true to form,” a young Jesuit sobbed when he learned of the death of his friend and fellow Jesuit Brother Richard “Richie” Michael Fernando, 26. As Richie lived, so did he die. He live working among the victims of violence, he died in the midst of them.

Richie was killed by a grenade on October 17 at the Jesuit –run Centre of the Dove in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. At the time of his death, Richie was doing his two-year-regency, that stage when young Jesuits studying to be priests get immersed in an apostolate. Richie had spent two years each in the novitiate, juniorate and in philosophy studies. He had made his simple vows as a Jesuit, hence the ‘S.J’. After his name and had four more years of theology studies to go before he gets ordained. He would have been a priest by the year 2001.

Bloom Where You Are

The radical theology of Therese of Lisieux

By Ma. Ceres Doyo

Through her pen the world learned about the story of her soul and her wondrous journey into deep intimacy with God. She did not have a huge following when she was alive for she lived in obscurity in a Carmelite monastery. She did not leave behind large missionary foundations. But through her writing that were made public after she died at the age of 24 in 1897, people got to know her and were amazed at the depth of her spirituality.

Saint Therese of the Child Jesus and the Holy Face, popularly known as Saint Therese of Lisieux or the Little Flower, has arrived in the country. Most Filipinos know her as Santa Teresita. Her relics arrived for a three-month journey across the Philippines and some parts of Asia. The veneration of relics of saints is not idolatry. According to a primer on St. Therese relics, “The veneration must be seen in the way men and women of all ages and cultures venerate the dead and pray in front of her mortal remains. The relics of the saints, meditations of their presence and memorials of their historical existence evoke their humanity – the way they lived, worked, suffered and prayed. Through their relics, God manifest His presence and shows forth His might and glory.” Bishop Ramon Arguelles, Military Vicar and Chair of the millennium Saint Foundation, says that in welcoming  Therese’s relics, and her little way of confidence and love, the Church welcomes God’s merciful love. He quotes the Bible, saying: “And a little Child shall lead us.”

Christmas Came Early

Extracts from an article by Ceres Doyo

1970, Negros Occidental. Elenita Flores was 19, a senior at the West Negros College in BacolodCity. Nita was not typical teenager who sang about the Age of Aquarius and wore beads and platform shoes. Her concerns were different – teaching catechism, completing her education, living up to the expectations of her big family in the town of Kabankalan.
Nita’s home province was in the throes of social upheaval. The few rich were very rich and the poor, to which Nita’s family belonged, were getting poorer. Nita’s family was struggling but was not the poorest of the poor.

Nita was in her last years in college, majoring in Education, when she felt her life reaching a dead end. She was listless and raging inside. She had just broken off with her boyfriend. Back home in Kabankalan, things were not easy, Nita felt alone with no one to turn to.

Christmas Came Early Continuation

By Ceres Doyo

He was into cars, her family was into real estate. Both belonged to upper-class Caucasian community that had grown roots in the Philippines and established business here.

When they first saw the four month-old Noel at the Heart of Mary villa, the baby reached out to them. Noel chose them. They named him Michael Angelo.

Happy Kid

“I always knew I was adopted,” Michael says causally. He does not remember when or how he knew but being adopted did not seem like a big deal to him then. Certainly he looked different from his fair-haired cousins and their friends – but he was one of them. He was doted on by his grandparents and aunts and uncles. “I was a happy kid. I had everything. I was close to my mom but i was surrounded by yayas,” Michael laughs.

No greater Love

By Ma. Ceres Doyo

“True to form, true to form,” a young Jesuit sobbed when he learned of the death of his friend and fellow Jesuit Brother Richard “Richie” Michael Fernando, 26. As Richie lived, so did he die. He live working among the victims of violence, he died in the midst of them.