Our Hideaway

‘Girls, wear skirts tomorrow!’

Alma told her story in the September-October 2003 issue of Misyon. This article is related to what she wrote then. Alma passed the Civil Service and Teachers' Board exams in 2007.

‘S-K-I-R-T-S!!! Not again!’

Announcements like this during my college days used to make my day glum. It’s not that I hated wearing skirts, but my appearance when wearing them concerned me most and thus made me crawl from shame.

One of my downfalls was that I had no self confidence when it came to my body structures. I didn’t have that ‘Coca-cola figure’ to be proud of. I just had the typical body of an Igorot with strong, robust calves and arms due to heavy work in the fields. That’s why I didn’t have the nerve to wear mini-skirts just like everybody else did. When I tried it once, it seemed that everyone was staring at me and saying in their minds, ‘Hey! Look at that. She’s got no shame at all parading those robust, scarred calves!’ Those sarcastic glares just gave me the strength to dash to my boarding house to change my clothes. So during my high school years, I had my uniform skirts tailored three to four inches below the knee to conceal my calves.

A venue for the youth to express themselves and to share with our readers their mind, their heart and their soul. We are inviting you – students and young professionals – to drop by Our Hideaway and let us know how you are doing.

The Way I Remember ‘Daday”

By Faith S. Lagos

In our lives we experience a lot of things which shape our future.

I was born into a family where everyone believes in God, that God is always the center of our lives. My father is the most disciplined and loving father. My mother is     the light of our family. She is a teacher, a good counselor and the most caring mother in the whole world. My brother is the most handsome brother of all. He loves to play the keyboard and to drive me to school. My sisters are beautiful and charming. My sister Joy is a good singer while my sister Charie is a beauty queen in her own right. I, Faith, am the apple of their eye. I’m the youngest in the family.

We live in a small town named Dueñas. It’s a one-hour drive from the city. It’s a place where people know one other. I live in a two-hectare compound. My grandparents live with us too.

A venue for the youth to express themselves and to share with our readers their mind, their heart and their soul. We are inviting you – students and young professionals – to drop by Our Hideaway and let us know how you are doing.

Retreat Retreat with God

By Athea Myrnette ‘Aia’ Orayle Caspe

The author graduated from high school this year at St Peter’s College of Ormoc.

My recent retreat was really a vacation with God.  I did not expect that it would be that good and such a relief.

For the first time, I was able to talk to God wholly in an honest letter to Him. I told Him all my happiness and doubts. After that, my teacher handed each one of us a letter from God. Even though I knew it wasn’t really from God, I really felt thrilled and happy at receiving and reading the letter. What made my heart beat faster was when I started reading it!

A venue for the youth to express themselves and to share with our readers their mind, their heart and their soul. We are inviting you – students and young professionals – to drop by Our Hideaway and let us know how you are doing.

I am because of her

By Jomar B. dela Cruz

On 6 June 1987, at around one o’clock in the morning, my tender-hearted mother gave birth to a very healthy little boy. I had an angelic, candid face and a lovely, soft voice. My parents truly believed that my birth was a wonderful blessing for them. With their names they named me, Jomar. They made me the heir of both their beautiful names, ‘Jo’ from my mother’s name, Jocelyn, and ‘Mar’ from my father’s name, Mario.

I grew up in an atmosphere of love. My parents unhesitatingly gave me everything I wanted. When I cried, they would panic! They loved me very much! Perhaps, I experienced the greatest love of all.

A venue for the youth to express themselves and to share with our readers their mind, their heart and their soul. We are inviting you – students and young professionals – to drop by Our Hideaway and let us know how you are doing.

My Social Responsibilities

By Dennis Rolan Labandia

Dennis Rolan Labandia is a freshman at Xavier University, Cagayan de Oro. Here he shares his experience of serving his community through the NSTP (National Service Training Program).

In conformity with government regulations, Xavier University requires all freshmen to register for two semesters of NSTP during the regular enrollment period. This is a way of involving them in a commitment to be men and women for others.  In this sense, I feel my social responsibilities pertaining to an active social involvement in community work. This education promotes faith that is committed to the work of justice, preparing each one for an active life commitment as a person for others. It is geared to making the new generations become true catalysts of social change.

A venue for the youth to express themselves and to share with our readers their mind, their heart and their soul. We are inviting you – students and young professionals – to drop by Our Hideaway and let us know how you are doing.

 

IDLE THOUGHTS PAST AN ASH-HEAVEN MORNING

By Christopher Ong

Someone once told me that dreams are ad infinitum. So here I am, sixteen and surveying the vast and wide landscapes of my dreams.

One time, somebody got angry with me and told me I was a person who could never change. I agree. I never changed my dreams, my principles, my point of view. Many times I vowed to improve, but how improved can a person really be?

OF LOSING AND GAINING

By May R. Sicat-Saquing

How sweet it was to reach 30! With a very loving and supportive husband who greeted me with aHappy Pearly White Birthday banner, 30 shots of firecrackers, a choir and my pearl-set jewelry (hidden in a cake), what more could I ask for?

I was born at 11:40am via Cesarean section on 5 May 1975. I told the people around me that I’d be one of the luckiest persons on earth when I turned 30 on 05-05-05. Indeed, I was.

A FORETASTE OF MY DREAM

By Narcelle B. Toñacao

When I was a child, being a nurse someday was always my dream. It’s as if it was a program in my mind because until now my goal hasn’t changed. It started when I had a car accident and was hospitalized for a month. The nurses were so dedicated in their profession. They took good care of me even if they were already tired from taking care of other patients.

TRIBUTE TO A TEACHER

By Cherry Mee T. Degoro

One of the best features of Misyon is the youth page. I wish, one day, through this best feature I could pay tribute to my best teacher.

By Bernadette Pattugalan

The author is now in Fourth Year high school at St Scholastica’s College, Manila.

We had our class outreach in Pandacan, Manila, a squatters’ area where the houses are beside the railroad. I really didn’t know what to expect when we were going there. When we got off the jeepney, children came and greeted us.

They brought us on a tour around the place. While we were touring, a train was coming our direction. I felt its rush and roar, just a feet away from me. I realized at that moment the danger it could bring. I also asked myself, ‘Of all places, why build a house beside a railroad?’

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